A-Z of Dog Breeds

Airedale Terrier
The Airedale Terrier is a dog breed of the terrier type that originated in the valley (dale) of the River Aire, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is traditionally called the “King of Terriers” because it is the largest of the terrier breeds. The Airedale was bred from a Welsh Terrier and an Otterhound and probably some other Terrier breeds, originally to hunt otters. In Britain this breed has also been used as a war dog, guide dog and police dog.
He is an excellent family dog, particularly good with children and always ready to join in their games. Not aggressive by nature but protective of his family, he is a devoted companion, ready for a walk at any time or even a ride in the car. Hand in hand with his love of attention, he enjoys being trained. His double coat is waterproof and a daily brush and comb will keep him looking smart. However, he will shed his coat twice a year, and on these occasions it is advisable to have him professionally stripped. Provided he has daily exercise he is suitable for either town or country life.
Breeders / Rescue Centres

  • Mr D E Ablard lives in Bolton, Lancashire. He is a Kennel Club Assured Breeder and has been a member since 9th October 2015 after a successful visit was completed in October 2015. He specifically breeds Airedale Terriers . Contact him on 07799 604020.
  • J Callon & L Callon-Winn who live in Lancaster are a Kennel Club Assured Breeder since 11th April 2014. They are assured breeders of 3 breeds of terriers including Airedale Terriers. They have also have five litters registered with the Kennel Club. They are members of other breed clubs and have at least 3 dogs registered in the Studbook. Contact them on 07967131352.
  • Airedale Rescue is based in Monmouthshire, Wales. It is a rescue organisation run by Lynda McCarthy. The people who help run the rescue centre have many years experience working with Airedales and particularly re-homing them taking into consideration specific needs and requirements of both the dog and owner. For more information visit www.airedalerescue.org.uk

Alaskan Malamute
The Alaskan Malamute is a large breed of domestic dog originally bred for hauling heavy freight because of their strength and endurance, and later a sled dog. They are similar to other arctic breeds, such as the Greenland dog, Canadian Eskimo Dog, the Siberian Husky, and the Samoyed.
His coat is thick in the coarse outer guard coat and in the woolly undercoat, so he doesn’t notice the cold and will curl up and sleep in a blizzard that would send lesser canines running for shelter. Not only massively built, the Malamute is also dignified; this does not mean he lacks a sense of play, but he sometimes doesn’t know his own strength. If he takes off after another dog, his handler needs good brakes. Being large, he requires plenty of food for energy. He certainly likes his exercise and is not a dog for the lazy.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mrs J Brook from West Yorkshire has been a Kennel Club Assured Breeder since February 28th 2006. She specifically breeds Alaskan Malamutes. She has at least 5 litters registered with the Kennel Club, is a current member of one or more breed clubs and has at least 3 dogs listed in the Studbook. Contact her via www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services
  • Chayo- An Alaskan Malamute breeding organisation run by Sue Ellis who lives in Sale. She has 20 years experience with the breed. It is the ‘highest winning and consistently producing UK Malamute Kennel of all time’. Sue is also an A list judge in Crufts and is qualified to give certificates, judge around the world and writes breed notes for top canine weekly paper ‘Our Dogs’. Sue also has multiple awards both in the UK and abroad including Top UK Malamute 2003-2015. Contact her via www.alaskanmalamute.uk.com.
  • The Alaskan Malamute Club UK is a rescue centre for Malamutes. It was formed in 1964 when a group of enthusiasts got together to promote the breed. It is run by voluntary members on a non-profit making basis. They are dedicated to finding new homes for homeless Malamutes. See more about them at www.malamuterescue.org.uk/
Basset Hound
The Basset Hound is a short-legged breed of the hound family. The Basset is a scent hound that was originally bred for the purpose of hunting hare. Their sense of smell for tracking is second only to that of the Bloodhound. The name Basset is derived from the French word bas, meaning “low”. Basset Hounds are usually bicolours or tricolours of standard hound colouration.
The Basset Hound is sweet, gentle, devoted, peaceful and naturally well-behaved. He fits into family life well. His temperament should always be friendly very affectionate with his owner and friendly with children. He can be a bit stubborn with meek owners and needs a firm, confident, and consistent owner who displays natural authority over the dog.
Breeders / Rescue Centres

  • Bassett Hound Welfare is a rescue and re-homing centre for Bassetts. It is the ‘only official site for Bassett Hound welfare and the only Bassett rescue recognised and listed by The Kennel Club.’ Since achieving charity status in 1997 they have re-homed over 2000 Bassetts. They have representatives in areas all over the UK available to talk to and give advice to anyone looking to rescue a Bassett Hound. For more information visit www.bassethoundwelfare.org.uk.
  • Lyn Bailey is based near Ludlow, Shropshire and has worked with dogs for around 45 years. She rescues Bassetts and works with them as well as potential owners to get them re-homed. She offers any training/treatment they may need including neutering, vaccinations and worming. Once the dogs have been health checked Lyn spends time getting to know the potential owners, their work hours and if they have any children or pets so she is able to match the best owner and dog together. She has a lot of success stories on her website www.bassethoundrescue.co.uk. Contact her through email at Lynbailey32@yahoo.com or call her on 07923207841.
  • Mrs V L Green who lives in Stoke-On-Trent has been a Kennel Club Assured Breeder since 31st July 2007. She breeds two different breeds including Bassett Hounds and Retrievers. She is an experienced breeder with at least 5 litters registered with the Kennel Club, she has Breed Club membership and has bred at least 3 dogs that are registered in the Studbook. Her contact number is 07840377234.
Beagle
The Beagle is a breed of small-sized hound, similar in appearance to the much larger foxhound. The Beagle is a scent hound, developed primarily for hunting hare. Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. They are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques.Their noses guide them through life, and they’re never happier than when following an interesting scent.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Beagle Welfare is a charity that was formed in 1997 after a successful application was made to charity commissioners in 1990. Their aim is to prevent the maltreatment of Beagles, provide advice and guidance to Beagle owners, and to re-home Beagles whose owners are unable to do so. Since they began they have re-homed thousands of Beagles. In 2013 they opened a national re-homing centre which is based near Burton Upon Trent. Visit www.beaglewelfare.org.uk to find out more.
  • Beagle Buddies foster, promote and re-home Beagles currently in rescue centres across the UK. They are teamed up on a national level working with several rescues to help re-home Beagles. Any successful adoption is always followed up by random home visits so they are able to check on the progress and condition of each Beagel. Their website is www.beaglebuddies.co.uk.
  • Mr J + Mrs J Woodcock from Wigan have been Kennel Club members since 30th November 2009. They specifically breed Beagles and have been assured breeders since September 2013 after a successful visit was made. They have breed club membership as they are current members of one or more breed club. Call them on 01942 23904.
Bichon Frise
The Bichon Frise loves human company and demands much of your attention. He is easy to live with, a cheerful, pleasant house dog who enjoys playing games, snuggling into laps and pillows, and perching on the back of the sofa so he can peer out the window.
Exercise needs are easy to meet: a daily walk or two, plus a small yard in which to trot around and stretch his legs. Bichons are peaceful with everyone, including other pets. Sometimes they can be timid, so early socialisation is important to develop their confidence and rprevent any separation anxiety.
Though he does have an independent streak, the Bichon Frise is not a dominant dog and responds well to training. He prefers learning tricks to formal obedience and is especially bright-eyed when food treats are offered as rewards.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Bichon Frise Rescue was established in the 1970’s and is run by a group of volunteers. It is an official Kennel Club registered and non-profit organisation. They are listed on the Kennel Club breed rescue directory and website. The volunteers take Bichons into their own homes to work with them and do not use sanctuaries or kennels. They provide information and advice to owners who are thinking of giving their Bichons up and also to new potential owners who may have questions. Visit them at www.bichonfriserescue.co.uk.
  • Mr M J Beater from Bristol has been a member of the Kennel Club assured breeders since 30th September 2006. He breeds Bichon Frise puppies specifically. He has a badge for an experienced breeder having 5 or more litters registered with Kennel Club. He is currently a member of more than one breed club and has at least 3 dogs registered in the Studbook. Contact him on 07711 576964.
Bedlington Terrier
The Bedlington Terrier is a breed of small dog named originally bred to hunt vermin in mines, but has since been used in dog racing, numerous dog sports, as well as in conformation shows and as a companion dog. The Bedlington Terrier is milder-mannered, less rowdy, and calmer indoors than some terriers, but more athletic than you might imagine. They have powerful swimming skills, comparable to those of water dogs such as the Newfoundland, and are noted for being very quick and having high endurance. Bedlingtons are noted for their similarity in appearance to lambs. The dogs have blue, liver or sandy colouration, all three of which may have tan points. Their fur forms a distinctive top knot on the dog’s head. With the exception of eye problems, the breed is mostly free from health complaints. Agile and graceful, with a lightness of movement and a springy gait, the Bedlington Terrier needs access to a safe area where he can play and dodge and gallop. Once outdoors, he changes from docile couch potato to dauntless explorer. He is bright and clownish with his own family, his reaction to strangers varies from inquisitive to reserved; he needs early socialization so that any caution does not become timidity. They are generally peaceful with other pets, can be demanding and stubborn, but do respond well to obedience training that is upbeat and persuasive, preferably with food rewards.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • The Bedlington Terrier Rescue was set up by Phyliss Cooper and Barbara Butcher MBE in 1976. They now have a strong group of volunteers who have helped to work with the rescue dogs and have re-homed several hundred. They have a home enquiry form on their website that they require potential owners to fill in beforehand so they are able to work with them and match them with the right dog. They do not require an adoption fee but do ask for donations to help. Visit their website www.bedlingtonrescue.co.uk. Contact them on 073978779515 or email info@bedlingtonrescue.co.uk.
  • Mr & Mrs Garbutt live in Leeds, West Yorkshire and have been Kennel Club assured breeders since 1st May 2015. They have been Kennel Club members since 31st March 2009. They have a badge for experienced breeders with at least 5 being registered with The Kennel Club. They are current members of more than one breed club and have at least 3 dogs registered in the Studbook. Contact them on 01132 631551.
  • Mr & Mrs Ames have been members of the Kennel Club since 31st March 2001. They only breed Bedlington Terriers and have been Kennel Club assured breeders after a successful visit was made in April 2014. Contact them on 01432 840796 for more information.
Bernese Mountain Dog
The Bernese Mountain Dog is a large-sized breed of dog, one of the four breeds of Sennenhund-type dogs from the Swiss Alps. This mountain dog was originally kept as a general farm dog and in the past were also used as draft animals, pulling carts.
His skin, especially on his head, is rather wrinkled, and his ears, which are set low, should be long, reaching beyond the length of his muzzle. He loves to paddle his way through the wet and mud of a winter field, but he cleans up remarkably easily because of his short, close coat. The Bernese Mountain Dog is steady-tempered and easygoing. However, his calmness and willingness to laze about doesn’t mean he can be cooped up without exercise. Indeed, the Bernese loves getting out, especially in cool weather — with his thick black coat, he doesn’t do well in hot climates. His attitude toward strangers varies from friendly to aloof. A Bernese Mountain Dog puppy needs lots of socialisation so that his natural caution does not become timidity. Responsive to obedience training in a slow, good-natured way, this sensitive breed should be handled kindly, with much praise and encouragement. However, they’re not complete pushovers to train.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Bernese Welfare UK was established in 1985. It is one of the services provided by ‘The Bernese Association of Great Britain’, in their hope to provide aid to Bernese Mountain dog owners in the UK. The main aim of Bernese welfare UK is to provide help to owners and give advice to possible new owners. Visit their website www.bernesewelfare.btck.co.uk or call 01787 317940.
  • B Mair & C Hartley-Mair from Rochdale have been members of the Kennel Club since 30th November 2008. They breed 3 different breeds including Bernese Mountain dogs. They have been certified breeders since 2014and they have a badge for experienced breeders with at least 5 litters registered with the Kennel Club. Contact them on 01706 649900.
  • Mrs L Gorbould lives in Maidstone, Kent and has been a Kennel Club member since 31st January 2006. She breeds only Bernese Mountain dogs and has been a Kennel Club assured breeder since a successful visit was completed in November 2015. She is an experienced breeder with at least 5 litters registered with the Kennel Club. Contact her on 01622737935 for more information.
Border Collie
The Border Collie is a working and herding dog breed developed in the Anglo-Scottish border region for herding livestock, especially sheep. It was specifically bred for intelligence and obedience. He is known for his intense stare with which he controls his flock. He’s a dog with unlimited energy, stamina, and working drive, all of which make him a premier herding dog; he’s still used today to herd sheep on farms around the world. The highly trainable and intelligent Border Collie also excels in various canine sports, including obedience, flyball, agility, tracking, and flying disc competitions.
He is graceful, but with sufficient substance to withstand the elements. A silent worker, he responds to any signal, audible or visual. His disposition is kindly as he is loyal and faithful by nature. Capable of thinking for himself, he is often used in mountain rescue work, makes an excellent tracker and is also used as a sniffer dog. He needs a lot of exercise, thrives on company and will participate in any activity. He is dedicated to serving his owner, but is the type of dog who needs to work to be happy and is not content to sit at home by the hearth all day.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • The Border Collie Trust is situated in Staffordshire and was founded in the 1970’s by Hazel Monk. Hazel worked with the Animal Welfare Trust and concentrated her efforts on Border Collies when they registered with the Kennel Club in 1976. The rescue centre is the base where they are able to care, rescue and re-home Border Collies. To adopt a Border Collie the first step is to visit the rescue centre where they will allow you to fill out an adoption form and you will be able to ask any questions/ get advice you want. Email them at info@bordercollietrustgb.org.uk or visit www.bordercollietrustgb.org.uk for more information.
  • Mr & Mrs Harris have been members of the Kennel Club since 31st October 2008 and breed two breeds including Border Collies. They have been certified breeders since March 2014 after a successful visit was made. Contact them on 07825 516606.
  • Mrs Jay who lives in Ashford, Kent and has been a member of the Kennel Club since 28th February 2007. She has been a certified dog breeder since a successful visit was made in Jan 2014. She also has a badge for experienced breeder with more than 5 litters registered with the Kennel Club. Contact her on 01580 291039.

Border Terrier

The Border Terrier is a small, rough-coated breed of dog of the terrier group. The need to work is deeply ingrained in a Border Terrier’s nature which means they are one of the most alert and quick dogs of their type around. With this said these little dogs adapt incredibly well into a home environment and quickly become valued members of the family. The one thing they do need, however, is to be kept busy mentally and physically otherwise boredom sets in which can lead to a Border Terrier getting up to quite a bit of mischief around the home. He is perfectly capable of being an active member of a family, having a temperament that combines good nature with a terrier’s gameness. They do need to be kept busy to be truly happy and well-balanced characters. Border Terriers retain their strong instinct to chase down prey and like nothing better than to be outdoors doing what they do best which is just that. With this said, as long as they are given enough to do and lots of physical exercise, they fit in well as a family pet. As with other terriers, the Border Terrier really does need to be well-socialised from a young age. Border Terriers are intelligent little dogs which means they learn things quickly both the good and the “bad”. They can be a little stubborn at times and if they think there is something more interesting to do, they have a tendency to ignore a command to go off and do their own thing. They are also known to be highly skilled escape artists. Although hardy, the Border Terrier is a sensitive character and responds well to positive reinforcement training.

Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Border Terrier Welfare was established in 1981. Their aim is to find new homes for Border Terriers that need to be re-homed. They are a registered charity (No. 1116853) and are funded by donations and fund raising events. They currently re-home approximately 120 dogs a year varying between the ages of 4 months to 14 years. They have area representatives that you are able to call to get advice and also receive a request form for adopting a Border Terrier. Find out more at www.borderterrierwelfare.co.uk.
  • Mr & Mrs Bate from Wigan have been Kennel Club members since 31st May 2009. They focus on breeding Border Terriers only. They have been assured breeders since 10/5/2016 after a successful visit was made. Contact them on 07946656680.
  • Miss C Henderson from Preston has been a member of the Kennel Club since 31st January 2008 and has been a certified breeder since 12/8/2015 after a successful visit was completed. She is an experienced breeder. Call her on 01995 61368 for more information.
Boston Terriers
The Boston Terrier is a breed of dog originating in the United States. Boston Terriers are small and compact with a short tail and erect ears. They are highly intelligent, very easily trained, friendly and can be stubborn at times. The average life span of a Boston is around 11 to 13 years, though some can live well into their teens. Boston Terriers are known for being very intelligent, sometimes too much so. They have a sleek, shiny, straight coat with crisp white markings in a pattern that resembles a tuxedo. Boston Terriers have a broad, flat-nosed face without wrinkles. They belong to a class of dogs called brachycephalic. Like other brachycephalic dogs, the lower jaw is in proportion to the body, but they have a short upper jaw to give them a “pushed in” face. They have a slightly arched, proud neckline, a broad chest, and a sturdy, boxy appearance. Their tail is naturally short (docking is forbidden) and set low on the rump. The Boston Terrier’s small size and lively, affectionate nature make him a great family pet and companion. They love children and amuse people of all ages with their antics and unique, appealing expression. They are especially good companions for older people and apartment dwellers. Although gentle and even-tempered, they can have the gutsy attitude of their terrier ancestors.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • The Boston Terrier Rescue are a registered charity – No. 1163435 and are recognised by the Kennel Club as a breed specific rescue. They have attended Crufts in the past under ‘Find A Rescue’. It is run entirely by volunteers that rescue, rehabilitate and re-home Boston terriers. They also run a support group to offer help and advice to owners of Boston terriers and potential owners. To adopt a Boston terrier from this group they make home visits firstly to check the homes they could possibly be sent to and require potential owners to fill out a foster adoption form. Email them at info@ukbostonterrierrescue.co.uk or visit their website www.ukbostonterrierrescue.co.uk.
  • Mrs K Turner from Chorley has been a member of the Kennel Club since 30th April 2010. She breeds Boston Terriers specifically and has been an assured breeder since a successful visit was completed on 13/12/2013. She has a badge for being an Experienced Breeder and she also has Breed Club Membership.
  • Mr & Mrs Gavaghan who live in Blackpool have been Kennel Club members since 31st October 2008. They breed 2 breeds including Boston Terriers. They are kennel club assured breeders since February 2014 when a successful visit was made. They have 3 badges; Experienced breeder with 5 or more litters registered, they have breed club membership and are current members of one or more breed club and also have the Studbook achievement have bred at least 3 dogs registered in the Studbook.
Boxer
The Boxer is a medium-sized, short-haired breed of dog, developed in Germany. The coat is smooth and tight-fitting; colours are fawn, mahogany, black or brindled, with or without white markings, and white. A guarding breed of a high order, the Boxer is intelligent and, with patient firmness, tractable, but he needs to be convinced of the rightness of what he is asked to do. Hardy and full of stamina, his idea of a country walk is to get as wet and muddy as possible, but the shortness of his coat permits easy cleaning.He is not quick to pick a fight but ready to prove himself. Because of their playful nature and boundless energy, they are sometimes called the “Peter Pan” of the dog breeds. Boxers aren’t considered fully mature until they are three years old, meaning they have one of the longest puppyhoods in the world of dogs. The typical Boxer is intelligent, alert, and fearless, yet friendly. He’s loyal to his family and loves to play with them, but he’s also headstrong, especially if you try to use harsh training methods with him. Boxers are renowned for their great love of and loyalty to their families. Boxers are so loving that they often think they are lapdogs and try to lie as close to you as possible.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Boxer Dog Rescue Northern England is a registered charity – No. 1153127. They are a rescue organisation run by volunteers. Before putting any dog up for adoption they ensure all dogs are neutered and micro-chipped. A full assessment is then completed to ensure the dog is re-homed into the right family. They have an adoption form on their website that can be filled in once their policies have been read for anyone looking to adopt a Boxer dog. Emailthem at admin@boxerdogrescue.co.uk or visit their website http://www.boxerdogrescue.co.uk.
  • Mrs Baily from Beaworthy, Devon has been a member of the Kennel Club since 31st July 2011. She breeds only Boxers and is a Kennel Club assured breeder since a successful visit was made 6/10/2014.Contact her on 01409 231526.
  • Miss L A Fay-Smith from Carlisle, Cumbria has been a member of the Kennel Club since 24th January 2012. She breeds Boxers only and has been an assured breeder since 15/1/2015 after a successful visit was made. She has a number of badges including experienced breeder with 5 or more litters registered with Kennel Club and she has a breed club membership
British Bulldog
The pugilistic expression of this delightfully ugly dog belies his loving, affectionate nature to family and friends. He has a reputation for tenacity and is very courageous, strong and powerful. Although he is a little bit stubborn by nature, he is good-tempered with children, of whom he is also very protective. The impression he gives of being slow and sluggish is contradicted by bursts of speed that he can and does produce from time to time. Although Bulldogs are low to the ground, they are wide and muscular. Their broad heads have cheeks that extend to the sides of their eyes, and the skin on their foreheads should have dense wrinkles. Bulldogs have round, dark eyes. Their ears are small and thin, folded back like a rose. Their short tails are carried low on their rumps. The Bulldog’s muscular body leads him to have a distinctive gait. Because his stocky legs are set at each corner of his body, he moves with more of a waddle than a walk. Sociable and sweet, but with a reputation for courage that makes him an excellent watchdog, the Bulldog is a lover, not a fighter.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Bulldog Rescue & Re-homing Trust is a registered charity – No. 1115009 that was established in 1978. They are mainly a voluntary organisation that offer rescue and re-homing services to pure bred Bulldogs. To be able to adopt a dog you must first be registered on their website. You can then apply to adopt a dog. Once this is approved the potential owners and Bulldog will be able to have a trial. Find out more at www.bulldogrescue.org.uk.
  • Mrs & Mrs Owen from Manchester have been Kennel Club members since 30th April 2010. They specifically breed Bulldogs and have been assured breeders since 25/9/2014. You can contact them on 0161 6576090
  • Mrs L & Mr T Butterworth from Bolton have been Kennel Club members since 18th November 2013. They specifically breed Bulldogs and have been Kennel Club assured members since a successful visit was made on 10/10/2014
Cairn Terrier
The Cairn Terrier is one of the oldest of the terrier breeds, originating in the Scottish Highlands and recognized as one of Scotland’s earliest working dogs. The Cairn is curious and quick to learn. And, like all terriers, he’s independent and a bit stubborn. He must know who is in charge, or he will take charge. Early training and socialisation are essential. In spite of his independent nature, the Cairn is a sensitive dog. His feelings are easily hurt, and he doesn’t respond well to scolding or harsh corrections. Kind, positive training is the best method for teaching the Cairn. He is a wonderful family companion and is fun and entertaining, loves to play with kids, and sounds the alarm when visitors approach. He is able to compete in obedience or agility. They are usually left-pawed, which has been shown in dogs to correlate to superior performance in tasks related to scent. A Cairn is a great pet for anyone who wants an independent, alert companion with a take-charge attitude toward life.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • The Cairn Terrier Relief Fund is a registered charity that was established in 1969. They aim to assist Cairn Terriers that are put into their care that may have been abandoned, mistreated or for any other reason put into their care. The trustees make arrangements for potential owners to be able to adopt a Cairn and promote and encourage better care. As it is a voluntary organisation they rely on donations. To be able to adopt a Cairn potential owners must agree to the terms and conditions and complete an application form. Email chrismroberts1@gmail.comb or phone 01283 712498 for more information. Their website is www.cairn-rescue.co.uk.
  • Mrs L T Trimmer from Doncaster, South Yorkshire has been a Kennel Club member since 31st May 2009. She breeds a number of Terriers including Cairn Terriers. She has been a Kennel Club assured breeder since 9/3/2016. Phone her on 01302 742431 for more details.
  • Mrs V L Usher from Carlisle, Cumbria has been a Kennel Club member since 31st August 2008. She breeds 3 breeds including Cairn Terriers. She has been a kennel club assured breeder since 19/3/2014 after a successful visit was made.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a small spaniel. It originated in the United Kingdom and is one of the more popular breeds in many countries. Although he’s born to be a companion, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel retains the sporty nature of his spaniel ancestors. If he’s not sitting on a lap or getting a belly rub, nothing makes him happier than to flush a bird and then attempt to retrieve it. One of the largest of the toy breeds, he’s often as athletic as a true sporting breed and enjoys hiking, running on the beach, and dog sports such as agility, flyball and rally. The more restful members of the breed find success as family friends and therapy dogs. If the characteristic wagging of the Cavalier’s tail doesn’t melt your heart, surely his large, dark round eyes will. Warm with a sweet expression, they hold the power to encourage constant petting and unlimited supplies of food. When it comes to training, Cavaliers are generally intelligent and willing to try whatever it is you’d like them to do. Food rewards and positive reinforcement help ensure that training goes smoothly. Cavaliers have a soft personality but can vary from quiet and sedate to rowdy and boisterous.

Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Rescue and Welfare is a registered charity. Their aim is to ‘help the wellbeing and welfare of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels in the UK’. It is a group of volunteers as a national organisation that have a network of helpers throughout the UK who arrange home visits. To apply to adopt a Cavalier you must fill in an application form that can be found on their website so they are able to match the right dog with the right families. Once you adopt a dog they do ask for a donation towards the services. You can contact them on 01205 872066 or visit their website www.cavalierrescue.co.uk.
  • Mr R & Mrs K Lee from Wigan have been member of the Kennel Club since 28th January 2016. They specifically breed Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.
  • B Mair & C Hartley-Mair from Rochdale have been Kennel Club members since 30th November 2008. They breed a number of breeds including Cavalier King Charles Spaniels
Chihuahua
The Chihuahua is the smallest breed of dog and is named from the state of Chihuahua in Mexico. Chihuahuas come in a wide variety of sizes, head shapes, colours, and coat lengths. There are two varieties of Chihuahua – the Smooth Coat (short haired) and the Long Coat. Both the Smooth and the Long Coats have their special attractions, are equally easy to keep clean and well groomed. They are also characterised by the shape and size of thier heads; “apple head” and “deer head”. Apple head Chihuahuas are often thought of as more desirable. Chihuahuas are comical, entertaining, and loyal little dogs, absolutely brimming with personality – often a quirky and eccentric personality. You can find individuals who are lively or placid, bold or timid, feisty or mellow, confident or nervous, stubborn or eager to please. Small in physique, but extremely large in personality, they’re complicated creatures, and that first impression can thoroughly confuse prospective owners. They have quite a good temperament. While they are extremely affectionate they are also incredibly smart and may even be affectionately known as manipulative. Chihuahua’s both demand and give affection to anyone who they trust. They can also be very strong willed, intensely loyal and will become very attached to their owner if treated correctly. Although Chihuahua’s are smart animals, they may be slightly difficult to train, but when they want to learn they will do it quickly and efficiently.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Chihuahua Rescue UK aims to improve the lives of Chihuahuas who need a second chance. Any Chihuahua that is put into the care of Chihuahua rescue will be micro-chipped, neutered and fully vaccinated. To apply to adopt a Chihuahua an application form can be found on the website. Any potential homes are checked by experienced home checkers and all potential owners are asked to join their Facebook page where everybody is available to keep in touch. Their website is www.chihuahuarescue.co.uk.
  • Mr C & Mrs J Sparrow from Manchester have been Kennel Club members since 31st March 2010. They breed a number of breeds including Chihuahuas bith long coat and smooth coat. They have also been assured Kennel Club breeders since a successful visit was made on 5/2/2015. They have 3 badges to recognise their experience and quality of breeding. They also have another badge – the Accolade of Excellence as they denote a significant contribution to a breed. Contact them on 0161 9501474.
  • Mrs D J Gornall has been a Kennel Club member since 31st July 2009. They breed a number of breeds including Chihuahuas. They have been Kennel Club assured breeders since 30/1/2015. They can be reached on 01772864585.
Cocker Spaniel
The English Cocker Spaniel is an active, good-natured, sporting dog standing well up at the withers and compactly built. There are “field” or “working” cockers and “show” cockers. The most popular of the Spaniel family, the Cocker is an active, happy, small dog, who quickly adapts himself to his surroundings. He is highly intelligent and affectionate, and is in his element foraging around fields and hedgerows. He also employs his retrieving instincts around the house, and can often be found with a toy or slipper in his mouth, his tail wagging furiously, waiting for praise. They love to bark to let you know that there’s someone coming up the garden path, or there’s someone at the door, but if you’re looking for a burglar alarm, forget it, a Cocker is more likely to lick an intruder into submission! However, Cocker Spaniels can sometimes be timid which is why it’s especially important to make sure your puppy gets lots of socialisation as early as possible and that you continue to socialise him well past his first year to help him become a happy, confident dog…without behavioural problems. They can also be a little stubborn too, but they’re inquisitive and intelligent, and so willing to please – all of which make them very easy to train. They are equally happy as working gun-dogs, as affectionate companions, and as they are especially good with children of all ages, they make good family pets.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • The Cocker And English Springer Spaniel Rescue are a small group of Spaniel enthusiasts who work with a small group of volunteers to help raise funds that will help find new homes for the dogs in their care. To apply to adopt a Cocker Spaniel you must email them with a some information about yourself e.g. family life, pets, past experience with dogs. You must then fill in an application form or call them to let them know you would like to adopt a dog. The Trustee- Homing officer can be contacted via email at john@caessr.org.uk or by phone 01782 410399. Their website is www.caessr.org.uk.
  • Mrs H Hatton from Wigan has been a Kennel Club member since 31st October 2008. She breeds two breeds including the Cocker Spaniel. She has been a Kennel Club assured breeder since August 2014. Mrs Hatton is recognised as an experienced breeder, has breed club membership and is a current member of multiple breed clubs as well as having the Studbook achievement of 3 dogs registered in the stud book. Phone her on 07939670979 for more information.
  • Mrs L E Harrison from Preston has been a Kennel Club member since 7th January 2005. She specifically breeds Cocker Spaniels and has been a Kennel Club assured breeder since March 2016. her contact number is 01772 397376.
Corgi
The Corgi is a cattle herding dog breed which originated in Pembrokeshire, Wales. The corgi is one of the smallest dogs in the Herding Group. Corgis are famed for being the preferred breed of Queen Elizabeth II, who has owned more than 30 during her reign. These dogs have been favoured by British royalty for more than seventy years. Spirited and athletic, yet steady and dependable, the Corgi is a true “big dog on short legs.” Herding, obedience, agility, or chasing balls (with surprising speed) are both physical and mental enjoyable outlets for his enthusiasm and desire to work. He is polite with guests, reserved with strangers, and makes a sensible watchdog. This attentive breed learns quickly and responds well to obedience training. Yet he has the independent judgment and problem-solving abilities of a true herding breed, so you must have the confidence to establish and consistently enforce rules, or he may make up his own. Just like in humans, their personality varies from one dog to another. Some might be very submissive while others tend to be bossy. However, speaking on general terms, most Corgis will exhibit a large cheerful personality.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • The Welsh Corgi Rescue was accepted for registration in July 1978. They help to find new homes for Corgis that have been taken into their care through no fault of their own. Any one looking to adopt a Corgi is asked to fill out an application form. A local member will then go to the potential new home to ensure it meets the standards are required. The dog will then be given to the potential new home on a probation period and will be inspected on random occasions to ensure it meets the needs and welfare for the dog. Visit their website www.welshcorgirescue.co.uk.
  • Miss L J Roberts from Preston has been a member of the Kennel Club since 31st March 2007. She specifically breeds Welsh Corgi’s. Her number is 07974 141680.
  • Mr & Mrs Ashbridge from Preston have been Kennel Club members since 30th September 2010. They specifically breed Welsh Corgis. They have been assured breeders since November 2013. They have breed club membership and are current members of one or more breed club. They also have the Studbook achievement having bred at least 3 dogs registered in the Studbook. Contact them on 01772 613663.
Dachshund
The dachshund is a short-legged, long-bodied, hound-type dog breed. The standard size Dachshund was developed to scent, chase, and flush out badgers and other burrow-dwelling animals, while the Miniature Dachshund was bred to hunt smaller prey such as rabbits. The Dachshund is a short-legged, long-bodied, hound-type dog breed. This comical clown loves to play games and has a great sense of humour. He is a loyal little dog, very attached to his family, they’re usually good with other family pets, too, though they can be jealous when they want attention and they can be possessive of their toys. You need to put a firm stop to the first signs of jealousy or possessiveness so that these don’t become bad habits. Though the Dachshund makes a great house dog, he does need his daily walks on his lead! Dachshunds are chasers who will take off! As well as plenty of companionship. Loneliness will lead to excessive barking. Though bright and clever, Dachshunds like to do things their own way. In other words, they’re stubborn. Cheerful praise and treats should be offered freely, as they are proud little dogs who resist force. They become irritable when pushed too far, and they may respond defensively.
Dalmatian
The Dalmatian is a breed of large dog, noted for its unique black or liver spotted coat and mainly used as a carriage dog in its early days. Its roots trace back to Croatia and its historical region of Dalmatia. A good Dalmatian is a dependable, dignified gentleman, yet high-spirited and playful. This athletic, vigorous dog has great endurance and a working heritage and should be taken jogging, hiking, or biking on a regular basis, or otherwise allowed to romp in a safe, enclosed area. Some Dalmatians greet strangers with enthusiastic jumping, while others are politely reserved. Some have mild protective instincts. Unfortunately, skittishness and/or aggression are seen in some lines, and plenty of socialisation is required to promote a stable temperament. Usually good with other family pets, the Dalmatian is especially fond of horses. The Dalmatian was originally used to guard the carriages and horses of the upper class in the 1800’s. While the master was busy, it was the Dalmatian’s job to ensure the stock and carriage remained safe and untouched. Dalmatians are rowdy by nature and never fully outgrow their tendency to jump on people. They need to be exercised often, to keep in-house energy levels from getting out of hand. The Dalmatian dog breed has a personality and temperament that is out-going, playful, highly energetic, and intelligent. They make good family dogs, but the Dalmatian needs strong leadership, or they may try to be the boss of the home. One thing that people enjoy most about this dog’s temperament is how affectionate he is. He just loves to spend time amongst his family members, and will cheerfully cuddle up on the couch with you.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mrs M Baker from Manchester has been a Kennel Club member since 12th October 2012. She specifically breeds Dalmatians. She has also been an assured kennel club breeder since 6/2/2014. Phone her on 0161 7038151.
  • Mr and Mrs Goodswen have been Kennel Club members since 19th October 2012. They specifically breed Dalmatians. They have been Kennel Club assured breeders since December 2013. Contact them on 07821452320.
  • Dalmatian Welfare is a registered charity aiming to ‘help re-home Dalmatians whatever their background or breeding.’ They rely on voluntary help that they get from the ‘British Dalmatian Club’. They have lots of information on their website for potential new owners to look at. Any one interested in adopting a Dalmatian is asked to call their adoption co-ordinator on 07967360468 or contact them via the website www.dalmatianwelfare.co.uk
French Bulldog
The French Bulldog is a small breed of domestic dog. The bat ear is a distinctive feature of this breed and adds to the droll expression. He is medium-to-small-sized dog and bred in three colours – brindle, pied and fawn – with a short, easy-to-keep-clean coat. Very intelligent and always ready for fun, the French Bulldog has an affectionate disposition. Comfort means a lot to him and he will happily live in house or flat as an integral part of the family. Many Frenchies are friendly with everyone, while others are politely reserved. French Bulldogs will bark to announce visitors, but are otherwise quiet dogs. Usually peaceful with other pets, males may bicker with other males. The French Bulldog is quite stubborn and can be challenging to train, yet also surprisingly sensitive, remembers what he learns, and responds well to early, patient, persistent training that utilises food motivation. Frenchies are loving companions who thrive on human contact. If you want an outdoor dog who can be left alone for long periods, the Frenchie is not the breed for you. This is a dog who enjoys lavishing love on his human companions as much as he loves the same treatment in return. They generally get along well with everyone, including children. They can, however, be territorial and possessive of their owner, especially in the presence of other dogs. Socialisation is a must for this breed, but with their easy companionship this is an enjoyable task. With a nature that is both humorous and mischievous, the French Bulldog needs to live with someone who is consistent, firm, and patient with all the antics and idiosyncrasies that make him both frustrating and delightful.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Miss Entwistle & Mr Worlsey from Bolton have been Kennel Club members since 31st July 2009. They specifically breed French Bulldogs. They have been Kennel Club assured breeders since March 2015. They have a badge for experienced breeders as they have 5 or more litters registered with the kennel club. Their contact number is 07766773416.
  • Ms C Ash from Chorley, Lancashire specifically breeds French bulldogs. She has 3 badges- Experienced breeder with 5 or more litters registered, she has breed club membership and is a current member of one or more breed club and also has the Studbook achievement have bred at least 3 dogs registered in the Studbook. Contact her on 01257 261142.
  • The French Bulldog Rescue is a registered charity who ‘specialise in the rescue of French Bulldogs, are a non profit organisation run by two volunteers’. Their mission is to ‘rescue, rehabilitate and re-home French Bulldogs’. All dogs taken into their care are neutered. Any one looking to adopt a French Bulldog is asked to fill out an application form that can be found on their website. As it is a volunteer organisation they do rely on public donations and support. Visit them at www.frenchbulldogrescuegb.co.uk.
German Shepherd
German Shepherd is a breed of medium to large-sized working dog that originated in Germany. German Shepherds are working dogs developed originally for herding sheep. Since that time, however, because of their strength, intelligence, trainability, and obedience, German Shepherds around the world are often the preferred breed for many types of work, including disability assistance, search-and-rescue, police and military roles, and even acting. Early and ongoing socialisation is a must to develop a stable, confident temperament. Most German Shepherds are fine with other family pets, if introduced when young. However, some individuals are cat chasers, and many individuals are dominant or even aggressive with strange dogs of the same sex. Often used as working dogs, German Shepherds are courageous, keen, alert and fearless. They are also cheerful, obedient and willing to learn. They have a high learning ability. They love to be close to their families but can be wary of strangers. They only bark when they feel it is necessary to do so. This breed loves to be close to people and should not be left isolated for long periods of time. They need an owner who is naturally authoritative in a calm but firm and confident way. They are stable and well adjusted and for the most part good with other pets and excellent with children in the family. They should be trained and socialised from an early age.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mrs Guy from Wigan has been an assured breeder since August 2013. She has 2 badges- experienced breeder with 5 or more litters registered with kennel club, and club membership of one or more clubs. Her number is 01942 749971.
  • Mrs C Gervin from Manchester has been a Kennel Club member since 28th June 2013. She specifically breeds German shepherds and has been an assured breeder since December 2013. Contact her on 07717747817.
Golden Retriever
The Golden Retriever is a large-sized breed of dog bred as gun dogs to retrieve shot waterfowl such. Golden Retrievers have an instinctive love of water, and are easy to train to basic or advanced obedience standards. Golden Retrievers are well suited to residency in suburban or country environments. Although they need substantial outdoor exercise, they should be housed in a fenced area because of their instinctual tendency to roam. They shed copiously, particularly at the change of seasons, and require fairly regular grooming. They are one of the finest family dogs in the world: cheerful, demonstrative, trustworthy with everyone, and forgiving of any mistakes made by inexperienced owners. Friendly with everyone (strangers, children, dogs, cats, smaller pets), his bark is welcoming rather than protective. Golden Retrievers need a lot of exerciseand their activity requirements can be met with a couple of daily walks and tossing a stick in the yard. They enjoy pretty much any outdoor activity their owners participate in, whether walking, running, hiking, biking, swimming or playing chase with kids. Though they are naturally even tempered and don’t need hours of exercise, their large size makes them unsuitable for apartments. This is a social breed of dog who adores people and thrives on companionship. If left alone too long, especially without proper exercise, Golden Retrievers can develop Separation Anxiety which usually means destructive chewing.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mrs Burrows from Preston specifically breeds golden retrievers and has been an assured breeder since December 2013 after. She has two badges- experienced breeder and breed club membership being registered with at least one club. Contact her on 01772784237.
  • Mr B W Catterall from Wigan has been a Kennel Club member since 30th April 2010. He specifically breeds Golden Retrievers. He has been an assured breeder since September 2013. He has a number of badges recognising his experience and quality of breeding and has at least 3 dogs registered in the Studbook. Contact him on 01942 825267.
  • Happy Paws Puppy Rescue is a registered charity. They work with other rescues to help mainly Golden Retrievers and Labradors. They screen the dogs coming into their care first to ensure they are healthy and carry out a behaviour test. They rescue and re-home approximately 150 dogs a year. If you would like to adopt a dog you must firstly fill out an application form. Once this is done your application may be taken to the next stage where a home visit can be arranged. Their website is www.happypawspuppyrescue.co.uk.
Siberian Husky
The Siberian Husky is a medium size, dense-coat working dog breed that originated in north-eastern Siberia. The breed belongs to the Spitz genetic family. It is recognizable by its thickly furred double coat, erect triangular ears, and distinctive markings. Huskies are a very active, energetic, and resilient breed whose ancestors came from the extremely cold and harsh environment of the Siberian Arctic. He is also very playful, athletic, agile, and light on his feet. He loves the great outdoors and requires vigorous exercise, especially in cool weather. He should be taken running, hiking, and/or biking every day, always on-leash, for he is independent and born to run. If something catches his interest, he’ll be gone. Training is a challenge because the strong-willed Siberian Husky is inclined to use his intelligence in clever ways that suit his own purposes. Digging and howling are favourite pastimes. They require extensive training and exercise in order maintain good behaviour and only those with the time and energy to fully commit to a Husky should take on this breed. But Husky owners agree, you get out of a Siberian Husky what you put into him, and these reliable dogs are worth the effort. Huskies require firm leadership and 100% consistency when it comes to boundaries and rule enforcement. Their expressive eyes can be used to manipulate the softies of the house, so all family members must also be “trained” to be consistent with rules and leadership. The Siberian Husky Dog Breed has a personality and temperament that is playful and energetic. As intelligent dogs, Huskies have been known to be mischievous and they are easily bored; this breed needs plenty of supervision and activities, and they should not be left alone for long periods of time.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mr & Mrs Lloyd from St. Helens, Merseyside have been Kennel Club members since 2nd July 2012. They specifically breed Husky’s. They have been assured breeders since April 2016. Call them for more information on 01744 603020.
  • Miss Wolfe from Birmingham has been a Kennel Club member since 31st August 2007. She breeds 2 breeds including Husky’s. She has been an assured breeder since July 2015. She has a number of badges recognising her experience in breeding Husky’s. Contact her on 07967208999.
  • The Siberian Husky Welfare Association was based on an online forum run by Mick & Terry Brent who had been re-homing unwanted huskies for around 5 years. They found their commitment had increased and organised a ‘funding meeting’. In February 2007 both Mick and Terry and their volunteers had managed to re-home almost 700 Siberian Huskies. Any potential owners are matched with a dog they think fits best, are given advice and counselling and help with the costs of neutering their dogs. Their website is www.shwauk.org.uk.
Jack Russell Terrier
The Jack Russell Terrier is a small terrier that has its origins in fox hunting. Jack Russells are an energetic breed that rely on a high level of exercise and stimulation, and are relatively free from serious health complaints. This bright, clever, athletic breed is on top of everything that’s going on in his environment. Nothing gets by him. A solitary or sedate lifestyle is not suited to a Jack Russell Terrier. He requires full participation in the family and vigorous daily play sessions, especially ball chasing, which he tends to be passionate about – even obsessive. Too little exercise, too little companionship, and too little mental stimulation will quickly lead to boredom, which will in turn lead to destructive behaviours. Jack Russell Terriers are the biggest dogs you’ll ever meet in such a tiny package. They can run all day and keep coming back for more. They are sharply intelligent and absolutely nothing gets past them. There is no fooling a Jack Russell. They are spirited terriers, fearless and sassy with minds of their own and aren’t above causing mischief to get a laugh. They are highly trainable and are famous for their high-jumping antics. Jack Russell’s are terriers, and they exhibit many classic terrier traits including excessive barking, wilfulness, rudeness to strangers, dog aggression, possessiveness and jealousy. Proper training and socialization from an early age can ensure an even-tempered dog.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mrs Neild from Wigan has been a Kennel Club member since 15th April 2013. She has been a kennel club assured breeder since April 2014. She has a number of badges including experienced breeder. She also has club membership for a number of breeding clubs. Phone her on 079204855527.
  • Mrs Glasper from Seaton has been a kennel club assured breeder since July 2015. Her contact number is 01297 680451.
  • Jack Russell Terrier Rescue UK is a non profit organisation that helps to ‘save Jack Russell’s from abandonment, mis-treatment & works on re-homing unwanted pets.’ For any potential new owners a home check will be made and they require an adoption fee. An adoption application form can be found on their website www.jackrussellterrierrescueuk.org.
Labrador
The Labrador is a type of retriever-gun dog and is one of the most popular breeds of dog in the United Kingdom and the United States.A favourite disability assistance breed in many countries, Labradors are frequently trained to aid the blind, those who have autism, to act as a therapy dog and perform screening and detection work for law enforcement and other official agencies. They are prized as sporting and hunting dogs. One of the best dogs for children of all ages, Labradors are kindly, good-natured, and take most things in stride. Most Labradors are very friendly with everyone, though compared to Golden Retrievers, many Labs are just a bit more conservative with their affections. They are truly “man’s best friend,” and are at their happiest when engaged in family activities. They love running, hiking, swimming and playing fetch for hours on end and are extremely patient with children of all ages. Labs are a breeze to train, and as long as you are prepared to live with puppy-like behavior well into adulthood, they make an excellent choice for first time dog owners. The Labrador has a personality and temperament that is playful, energetic, and intelligent. While the Labrador is not a guard dog, they are excellent watch dogs. If properly socialized, they will have no problem getting along with other animals around the house.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mr P J & Mrs J M Thornton from Bolton have been Kennel Club members since 27th May 2011. They specifically breed Labradors. They have been Kennel Club assured breeders since May 2015. Contact them on 01204 411247.
  • Mrs D & Mr I McGill from Preston, Lancashire have been kennel club members since 31st March 2009. They specifically breed Labradors and have been assured breeders since 18/12/2013 after a successful visit was made. They have a number of badges including experienced breeder with 5 or more litters registered with the kennel club. They also have club membership being current members of one or more breed clubs. Phone: 01772 788372
  • Happy Paws Puppy Rescue is a registered charity. They work with other rescues to help mainly Labradors and Golden Retrievers. They screen the dogs coming into their care first to ensure they are healthy and carry out a behaviour test. They save and re-home approximately 150 dogs a year. If you would like to adopt a dog you must firstly fill out an application form. Once this is done your application may be taken to the next stage where a home visit can be arranged. Their website is www.happypawspuppyrescue.co.uk.
Lhasa Apso
The Lhasa Apso is a non-sporting dog breed originating in Tibet. Though small in stature, the Lhasa is a sturdy and independent dog. Early socialisation and training are absolutely critical to a Lhasa’s success as a family member, so that he can properly direct his natural tendency toward wariness. The time invested in training him, however, is well worth your effort in terms of the loyalty, joy, and companionship that this long-lived, hardy little dog provides. The Lhasa Apso personality is a special and interesting mix. He’s a happy, mischievous, and playful dog; he’s also regal, independent, and fierce. He takes the job of guarding his home and family seriously; he also takes a long time to grow up, and even then he remains somewhat puppyish until old age. The Lhasa may be small, but he isn’t a bit fragile. He’s sturdy and strong, and he’s naturally wary of strangers. He will make friends, but not until he knows that an individual poses no threat. He’s an excellent watchdog. The Lhasa is not extremely active and is content living indoors. Unlike many other breeds, he doesn’t need vigorous exercise to reduce nervous energy. However, he does enjoy and benefit from short walks and play sessions. The Lhasa likes to stay close to his family, following them room to room to join in the activities or sit on a lap. However, because of his independent nature, he’s fine when left alone at home for reasonable amounts of time. They are fearless and often at times bossy dogs who demand the attention of people whenever they are in the room. Some can be quite clownish, making mischief or performing for a laugh. They believe they are the centre of the universe, and like any self-respecting diva, Lhasas can be quite moody. Despite their egos, Lhasa’s generally have a heart of gold and bring great joy to the homes they reside in.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mrs H & Mr I Larkin from Blackpool Lancashire specifically breed Lhasa Apso’s. They have been assured breeders since March 2014. They have a badge for experienced breeder as they have at least 5 litters registered with The Kennel Club. Their contact number is 07791208285.
  • Ms Finch from Wigan breeds two breeds including the Lhasa Apso. She has been a Kennel Club assured breeder since July 2014. She has a badge for experienced breeder as she has at least 5 litters registered with kennel club. Phone her on 07549408174 for more information.
Miniature Schnauzer
The Miniature Schnauzer is a breed of small dog of the Schnauzer type that originated in Germany in the mid-to-late 19th century. Miniature Schnauzers developed from crosses between the Standard Schnauzer and one or more smaller breeds such as the Poodle and Affenpinscher, as farmers bred a small dog that was an efficient ratting dog. They are described as “spunky” but aloof dogs, with good guarding tendencies without some guard dogs’ predisposition to bite. Miniature Schnauzers are recognized in three colours internationally: solid black, black and silver, and a colour known as ‘salt and pepper’. There is a controversial fourth color variant in Miniature Schnauzers, pure white, which is not recognized universally. The breed remains one of the most popular worldwide, primarily for its temperament and relatively small size. Most Miniature Schnauzers are good with other family pets — though he may chase the family cat for fun, he’s seldom serious about it. Some are scrappy with other dogs of the same sex, but it is a tribute to their overall amiability that Miniature Schnauzers can often be grouped together with little or no bickering. Although he knows his own mind and often displays an obstinate resistance to walking on the leash, the Miniature Schnauzer responds well to obedience training. Many individuals win top awards in advanced obedience. They are incredibly smart and will use that intelligence to do things like open cabinets or closets to get at food, toys, or your favorite pair of shoes. They get along fine with other household pets Barking is a trait that can’t be trained out of Miniature Schnauzers. They are alert watchdogs who will sound the alarm early and often that something is approaching. Teaching your Schnauzer to obey commands to stop barking can save your eardrums, as the Mini Schnauzer’s bark can be quite shrill.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mr & Mrs Turner from Preston have been Kennel Club members since October 2013. They have a number of badges highlighting their experience as breeders. Their contact number is 01772 632543.
  • Mr & Mrs Thomas from Burnley specifically breed Miniature Schnauzers. They have been assured breeders since August 2014. Their contact number is 01282 838911.
Pug
The Pug is a breed of dog with a wrinkly, short-muzzled face and curled tail. The breed has a fine, glossy coat that comes in a variety of colours, most often fawn or black, and a compact square body with well-developed muscles. Pugs are known for being sociable and gentle companion dogs. The breed remains popular into the twenty-first century, with some famous celebrity owners. Sometimes playful and clownish, sometimes calm and dignified, always sturdy and stable, good-humored and amiable. Pugs are fine with other animals, though they can be jealous of another pet sitting in your lap. Though stubborn, Pugs seldom get into real mischief. Pugs are often called “shadows,” as they love to glue themselves to their owners’ sides and stay close to the action. While they do have a stubborn streak, they are generally not aggressive, and despite their small frames, they are stout little dogs, making them great pets for families with children. Pugs are exceptionally eager to please their owners, and owners who are consistent and patient can usually train their Pugs to exhibit the desired response to his or her prompts. Some Pugs have a tendency to make noise, whether barking, yapping, snorting, grunting or otherwise. Owners can discourage excessive “yappiness” with early training, and some Pugs actually make excellent watch dogs, so long as they are trained properly about when barking is appropriate. The Pug dog breed has a personality and temperament that is full of energy, vivacious, and fun-loving. While they do have a stubborn streak, they are generally not aggressive.
Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mrs A Slaney from Manchester has been a Kennel Club member since 9th October 2015. She specifically breeds Pugs and has been a Kennel Club assured breeder since October 2015. She has a badge for experienced breeder as she has 5 or more litters registered with the Kennel Club. Phone: 07493041665
  • Mr R & Mrs J Clark from Leigh, Lancashire specifically breed Pugs. They have been assured breeders since January 2014. They have various badges recognising their experience as breeders and have a Studbook achievement having bred 3 dogs registered in the Studbook. Contact them on 01942 742798.
  • The Pug Dog Welfare & Rescue Association is a registered charity in the UK. They have strict rules regarding the welfare, rescue and re-homing of all pugs. ‘It was first formed in 1973. In 1978 the Association became a registered charity’. A potential owner is asked to first read the guidance notes which can be found on the website. You will then be able to fill out an application form or contact them via email at adoption@pugwelfare-rescue.org.uk. Their website is www.pugwelfare-recue.org.uk.
Shih Tzu
A Shih Tzu also known as the Chrysanthemum Dog, is a toy dog breed, weighing 10 – 12 pounds when full grown, with long silky hair. Carrying himself with a proud, arrogant bearing, yet possessing a happy, sweet-natured temperament, the Shih Tzu is less demanding and less yappy than most other toy breeds. A lover of comfort and attention, he enjoys cuddling on laps and snuggling into soft pillows. Though he has an aristocratic demeanour, a stubborn streak, and definite likes and dislikes, the Shih Tzu doesn’t tend to get into much trouble, and even when he doesn’t obey very quickly, he’s easy to forgive. Training will actually go very well if you rely on consistency, praise, and food rewards. The most difficult thing to teach a Shih Tzu is house training. Shih Tzus make excellent watchdogs. They are alert, vigilant and will reliably bark when someone approaches his house. If not properly trained, however, a Shih Tzu’s barking can quickly get out of hand. Training must include lessons on obeying commands to cease barking. Shih Tzus are lap dogs and are by no means active, outdoorsy dogs. A simple walk around the block and some romping time in the yard or at the park are enough to meet their daily exercise requirements. They much prefer clowning around the house or curling up on a lap to a rigorous cardio workout.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mr J & Mrs M Henry from Chorley, Lancashire have been Kennel Club members since 31st October 2009 and specifically breed Shih Tzu’s. They have been assured breeders since November 2013. Contact them on 01257 412665.
  • Mr P Davies from Ashford breeds a number of breeds including Shih Tzu’s. He has been an assured breeder since May 2014. He has a badge of experienced breeder having at least 5 litters registered with kennel club. His contact number is 01233 732284.
Springer Spaniel
The Springer Spaniel is a breed of gun dog in the Spaniel family traditionally used for flushing and retrieving game. It is an affectionate, excitable breed with an average lifespan of twelve to fourteen years. The breed suffers from average health complaints. They are used as sniffer dogs on a widespread basis. The term springer comes from the historic hunting role, where the dog would spring birds into the air. Springers need early socialisation and training. Like any dog, they can become timid if they are not properly socialized — exposed to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they’re young. Early socialization helps ensure that your Springer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Springers have a good temperament, they are gentle, friendly and sociable dogs that make great companions. Intelligent, willing and obedient and a quick learner, brave, playful, pleasant and cheerful. This dog loves everyone. Owners need to be calm- although possess natural authority.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mrs J J Tracz from Liverpool specifically breeds Springer Spaniels and has been a Kennel Club assured breeder since February 2015. She has a badge for breed club membership being a member of one or more breed club. Contact her on 0151 4288990.
  • Mrs J Weyman from Maidstone, Kent has been a Kennel Club member since 18th April 2013. She specifically breeds Springer Spaniels and has been an assured breeder since May 2015. She has a badge for experienced breeder having at least 5 litters registered with kennel club. Contact her on 01622 677300.
  • The Springer Spaniel Rescue is a non-profit organisation ‘devoted entirely to the protection and rescue of Springer Spaniels’. They are a small group who rely entirely on donations. They have a list of criteria that any possible owners must meet before considering them. To view this you should visit the website to see if you fit the criteria. You will them be able to fill out an application form to apply. Their website is www.springerrescue.org.uk.
West Highland White Terrier
The West Highland White Terrier, commonly known as the Westie, is a Scottish breed of dog with a distinctive white coat. The Westie is everything a terrier was designed to be. Sturdy and bold, he needs his daily walks and interactive play sessions. Yet he is easier to handle and friendlier than some other terriers. He can adapt to any home in which he can be a full participant and busybody. Quick to announce anything amiss, including visitors, the Westie usually proceeds to welcome them inside with a gaily wagging tail. West Highland White Terriers can be bossy with other dogs of the same sex, but otherwise coexist with other dogs and cats more readily than most terriers. Assertive but cheerful, with the typical stubbornness and cleverness of a true terrier, the Westie must be shown that you are in charge, else he may become demanding and testy when he doesn’t get his own way. He does respond well to consistent discipline and to obedience training that utilises food rewards. Westies are very intelligent and definitely not “laid back”. They are happy, playful and affectionate but they are also tough, hardy, independent and tenacious! They are also possessed of no small amount of self-esteem. They can be assertive and demanding. This makes them a wonderful companion for those who appreciate and are charmed by the terrier temperament. Westies who are not sufficiently trained can become too difficult for an owner to handle. They need owners with a willingness to provide patience, obedience training, socialisation, understanding and plenty of quality time.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Mr A Taylor from Burnley specifically breeds West Highland Terriers. He has been an assured breeder since October 2014. He has a badge for being an experienced breeder having at least 5 litters registered with Kennel Club. Phone him on 07752654543 for more information.
  • Mrs D K Lancaster from York, North Yorkshire has been a Kennel Club member since 31st March 2009. She specifically breeds West Highland Terriers and has been an assured breeder since Jan 2016. She has 3 badges – experienced breeder with 5 or more litters registered, breed club membership and is a current member of one or more breed club and also has the Studbook achievement having bred at least 3 dogs registered in the Studbook. Phone her on 01904 788632 for more details.
Yorkshire Terrier
The Yorkshire Terrier is a small dog breed of terrier type, developed during the 19th century in Yorkshire, England, to catch rats in clothing mills. The defining feature of the breed is its maximum size of 3.2 kg, although some may exceed this and grow up to 6.8 kg. A popular companion dog, the Yorkshire Terrier has also been part of the development of other breeds, such as the Australian Silky Terrier. It has a grey, black, and tan coat, and the breed’s nickname is Yorkie. For certain, the Yorkie is lively and inquisitive, physically and mentally quick, and spends much time trotting or dashing around checking things out. A lover of comfort, the Yorkshire Terrier enjoys cuddling on laps and snuggling into soft pillows. Keen of eye and sharp of tongue, he won’t fail to announce strangers, often in a high-pitched voice. Early socialisation is required so that he doesn’t become too shrill. Some Yorkshire Terriers are bright and quick to learn, while others are rather wilful and opinionated. Yorkies often dislike walking on a leash and may dart to and fro until taught how to behave. These little dogs soak up attention and do not like to be left without companionship – even if your are only walking to the kitchen. Owners say their Yorkies follow them from room to room like little shadows. They are excellent companions for the elderly who have the time to focus all of their energy on their dog, but can be just as happy in families of all sizes. Yorkies do not require a lot of vigorous activity in order to remain healthy and happy. A daily stroll around the neighbourhood and some time to play every day will meet their requirements for exercise. They are naturally suspicious of new people and will bark incessantly, and in some extreme cases, will snap. They will bark at every little sight and sound, and are often difficult to live with in an apartment building where people are constantly coming and going. It is imperative that a Yorkie learns to obey commands to stop barking.Breeders/ Rescue centres

  • Miss Gordon from Preston has been a Kennel Club member since 30th September 2010. She specifically breeds Yorkshire terriers and has been an assured breeder since January 2015. Contact her on 01772 739899.
  • Mrs L Norris from Sheffield, South Yorkshire has been a Kennel Club member since 31st May 2009. She breeds a few breeds including the Yorkshire Terrier and has been an assured breeder since April 2014. She has 4 badges – Experienced breeder with 5 or more litters registered, breed club membership, is a current member of one or more breed club and also have the Studbook achievement having bred at least 3 dogs registered in the Studbook. They also have Accolade of excellence after denoting a significant contribution to a breed. Contact them on 01142 887036.
  • The Yorkshire Terrier and Toy Breed Rescue has been running for over 20 years. Each dog taken into their care is neutered/spayed, fully vaccinated and assessed before being put up for adoption. They offer all of the adopters ‘24/7 rescue back’ if for any reason they are unable to keep the dog. To be able to adopt a dog from them you must go to the website to read their terms and conditions and then fill out an application form or call them for advice on 01529 455623 or 07852965163. Ther website is www.yorkieandtoybreedrescue.co.uk.